Science

The Science Department here at Caterham High School aim to deliver a varied and dynamic curriculum to meet the needs of our diverse student population. We aim to deliver a fun, engaging and practical subject in a manner that develops critical thinking and independent learners. Science is a core subject and understandably so, as it provides the basic ideas, concepts and thoughts that help explain our surrounding and existence. With the development of science and technology changing at a rapid pace, it is essential that our students gain a confident level of scientific skills and understanding to enable them to access this development of science and technology. We aim to stimulate student’s curiosity about natural phenomena in the world around them and offer them opportunities to find explanations. Creating a purposeful learning environment enables us to engage learners at many levels and ensures pupils make good progress. The opportunity to linking direct practical experience with the ideas that lie at the heart of science, ensures that pupils have a broad understanding of scientific theories and develop their practical and enquiry skills.

We also aim to see our students develop a strong passion for the science subjects, Biology, Chemistry and Physics, and potentially choose a career in this path. Our department highlights the myriad career paths that can be taken on from a scientific field such as scientific research, Medicine and Engineering.

The Science Department consists of 8 fully functioning science Laboratories as well as 3 Preparation room. Amongst other advantages, 6 laboratories in the department have a Promethean interactive whiteboard and an extensive variety of appropriate software. Within the department are an experienced and well established team of 10 members of teaching staff, 3 science technicians and 1 learning support assistant.

Whilst studying science you will be expected to develop the following skills:

  • Developing explanations using ideas and models.
  • Challenge and collaboration in the development of explanations.
  • Developing argument.
  • Applications, implications and cultural understanding of scientific ideas, concepts and theories.
  • Communication for audience and with purpose.
  • Using investigative approaches: planning an approach.
  • Using investigative approaches: selecting and managing variables.
  • Using investigative approaches: assessing risk and working safely.
  • Using investigative approaches: obtaining and presenting primary evidence.
  • Working critically with primary evidence.
  • Working critically with secondary evidence.
  • Use ICT and data loggers in science experimentations.

Our Expectations

We expect all pupils to behave in a sensible and safe manner.

We expect all pupils to show respect to other people and treat them in the same way as they would expect to be treated themselves. This includes teachers, fellow pupils and support staff.

We expect all students to complete class work to the best of their ability, taking care with presentation and the quality of work produced.

  • Always date your work –underline it using a pencil and a ruler.
  • Title your work with chapter and underline it.
  • Rule off each piece of work.
  • Show clearly where homework starts and finishes.
  • Only use a black pen for writing.
  • Drawings must always be done in pencil.
  • Write necessary information only on the front cover
  • Tipp-Ex is not allowed in exams. Try not to use this in class.
  • Do not tear pages out of books – you may have to pay for it!
  • Keep your work tidy.

We have high expectations of our students and aim to motivate them to achieve the highest grades possible.

We expect pupils to regularly complete the homework that is set.

We expect pupils to arrive to class prepared. This means bringing the correct equipment or resources for that lesson.

We expect pupils to bring a scientific calculator to all science lessons.

We believe that it is important that pupils of all ages can work individually and together in teams to explore and develop ideas.

KS3

The Science Department at Caterham High School is committed to ensuring that all students make outstanding progress. The department aim to develop learners who have a passion for knowledge and the imagination to become the Scientists of tomorrow. Through a continual promotion of scientific careers, educational trips and enrichment opportunities we aim to ensure that a large number of our students are able to pursue careers in Science.

Key Stage 3

At Key Stage 3 students following the Exploring Science curriculum which covers all of the Sciences - Biology, Chemistry and Physics at a foundation level. During Science lessons students will focus on Working Scientifically, developing their independent learning skills and communication skills. Students will also improve their literacy skills through completing extended pieces of scientific writing to demonstrate knowledge and understanding. Students are continually assessed throughout the course, completing assessment tasks and written exams.

Year 7 Topics

Year 7 topics Units
Biology 7A Cells, tissues, organs and systems
  7B Sexual reproduction in animals
  7C Muscles and bones
  7D Ecosystems
Chemistry 7E Mixtures and separation
  7F Acids and bases
  7G The particle model
  7H Atoms, Elements and Compounds
Physics 7I Energy and changes
  7J Electricity
  7K Forces
  7L Sound
Year 8 topics Units

Biology

8A Food and digestion

  8B Sexual reproduction in plants
  8C Breathing and respiration
  8D Unicellular organisms
Chemistry 8E Combustion
  8F The Periodic Table
  8G Metals and their uses
  8H Rocks
Physics 8I Fluids
  8J Light
  8K Energy transfers
  8L The Earth and Space

 

KS4

In year 9 students begin studying Edexcel GCSE. There are two pathways that students may take based on their end of Key Stage 3 progress and attainment. Students will either follow a Separate Science or Combined Science pathway. All exams are linear and will be completed at the end of Year 11. 

Year 9, 10 and 11 topics – Separate Science pathway

Paper 1 – Biology (*Paper code: 1BI0/ 1F, 1BI0/ 1H)

Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes

50% of the qualification

100 marks

Content overview

Topic 1 – Key concepts in Biology

Topic 2 – Cells and control

Topic 3 – Genetics

Topic 4 – Natural selection and genetic modification

Topic 5 – Health, disease and the development of medicines

Assessment overview

A mixture of different questions styles, including multiple-choice questions, short answer questions, calculations and extended open-response questions.

 

Biology A/AS Level OCR

Course Requirements 

‘BB’ in double award GCSE Science or ‘B’ in GCSE Biology as part of a minimum entry requirement into 6th form with 7 A* - C.

Who Teaches Biology?

Mr Gillham, Mr Koomson, Mr Charles and Ms Sembi

Each group is usually shared between two teachers.

What Course Do We Follow?

The 2015/2016 cohort of Year 12 will follow the new OCR Biology A specification, which has some major difference to the previous course:

There is no longer any controlled assessment tasks.  The students will complete a number of set practical tasks as part of their normal lessons during the year in order to complete a practical log book, and they will be tested on these practical skills in their exams.

The AS exam will not count towards the final A level grade: it is classed as a totally separate award.  The A Level grade is based purely on the exams completed at the end of Year 13.

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-biology-a-h020-h420-from-2015/

Students are expected to achieve at least a GRADE 'D' at AS to continue to A2.

How Will I Be Assessed?

Progress tests are given at the end of each part of every module; these are used for the regular progress checks.  Mock exams are given in late January.

Course Outline For New Biology AS/A Level:

Year 12

Module 1: Development of practical skills in Biology

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and real exam in May/June.  These skills are combined in the other modules.  There is no practical endorsement separate from the AS grade.

Module 2: Foundations in Biology

Progress tests for each topic and a real exam in May/June.

Module 3: Exchange and Transport

Progress tests for each topic and a real exam in May/June.

Module: Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease

Progress tests for each topic and a real exam in May/June.

Year 13

Module 5: Communication, Homeostasis and Energy

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and a real exam in May/June.

Module 6: Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems

Progress tests for each topic and a real exam in May/June.

Practical Endorsement 

A separate additional Pass/Fail is recorded for student's practical work from their logbook.

Year 13 Field Trip

Chemistry A/AS Level OCR

Course Requirements

‘BB’ in double award GCSE Science or ‘B’ in GCSE Chemistry as part of a minimum entry requirement into 6th form with 7 A* - C.

Who Teaches Biology?

Mr Ocansey, Mrs Mir and Mrs Naik.

Each group is usually shared between two teachers.

What Course Do We Follow?

The 2015/2016 cohort of Year 12 will follow the new AQA Chemistry specification, which has some major difference to the previous course:

  • There is no longer any controlled assessment tasks.  The students will complete a number of set practical tasks as part of their normal lessons during the year in order to complete a practical log book (kept in school), and they will be tested on these practical skills in their exams.
  • The AS exam will not count towards the final A Level grade:  it is classed as a totally separate award.  The A level grade is based purely on the exams completed at the end of Year 13.
  • http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/as-and-a-level/chemistry-7404-7405

Students are expected to achieve at least a GRADE ‘D’ at AS to continue to A2.

How Will I Be Assessed?

Progress tests are given at the end of each part of every module; these are used for the regular progress checks. Mock exams are given in late January.

Course Outline For New Chemistry AS/A Level:

Year 12

Module 1 Physical structure:

Atomic structure

Kinetics

Oxidation, reduction and redox equations

Bonding

Energetics

Equilibrium

Moles

Module 2 Inorganic chemistry:

Periodicity

Group 2 and 7 elements

Module 3 Organic chemistry

Introduction and to organic chemistry

Alkanes

Organic analysis

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and a real exam in May/June.  There is no practical endorsement separate from the AS grade.

Year 13

Module 1 Physical structure:

Thermodynamics

Rate equations

Equilibrium constant Kp for homogeneous systems

Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells

Acids and bases

Module 2 Inorganic chemistry:

Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides

Transition metals

Reactions of ions in aqueous solution

MODULE 3 Organic chemistry:

Optical isomerism

Aldehydes and ketones

Carboxylic acids and derivatives

Aromatic chemistry

Amines

Polymers

Amino acids, proteins and DNA

Organic synthesis

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Chromatography

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and a real exam in May/June.  A separate additional Pass/Fail is recorded for student's practical work from their logbook.

Physics A/AS Level OCR

Course Requirements

‘BB’ in double award GCSE Science or ‘B’ in GCSE Physics as part of a minimum entry requirement into 6th form with 7 A* - C.

Who Teaches Physics?

Mr Ocansey, Mr Denney and Mr Koomson.

Each group is usually shared between two teachers.

What Course Do We Follow?

The 2015/2016 cohort of Year 12 will follow the new OCR Physcics A specification, which has some major difference to the previous course:

  • There is no longer any controlled assessment tasks.  The students will complete a number of set practical tasks as part of their normal lessons during the year in order to complete a practical log book (kept in school), and they will be tested on these practical skills in their exams.
  • The AS exam will not count towards the final A Level grade:  it is classed as a totally separate award.  The A level grade is based purely on the exams completed at the end of Year 13.
  • http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-physics-a-h156-h556-from-2015/

Students are expected to achieve at least a GRADE ‘D’ at AS to continue to A2.

How Will I Be Assessed? 

Progress tests are given at the end of each part of every module; these are used for the regular progress checks. Mock exams are given in late January.

COURSE OUTLINE FOR NEW CHEMISTRY AS/A LEVEL:

Year 12

  • Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics
  • Module 2 – Foundations of physics
  • Module 3 – Forces and motion
  • Module 4 – Electrons, waves and photons

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and a real exam in May/June.

 

There is no practical endorsement separate from the AS grade.

Year 13

  • Module 5 – Newtonian world

    and astrophysics

  • Module 6 – Particles and

    medical physics

Progress tests for each topic, a mock exam in January and a real exam in May/June.

 

A separate additional Pass/Fail is recorded for student’s practical work from their logbook